Search Term: \"ACT vs SAT\"

ACT vs SAT: Changing the Game to Be Even More Complicated

In the Red Queen’s Race that is the the college admissions test market, the ACT has made its counter push to the SAT’s latest sprint. The ACT has announced a revision to the essay and the introduction of a new scoring rubric. The changes are scheduled to be rolled out some time in 2015.

The ACT essay, which had until now has consisted of a topic concerning high school life, will now have students “evaluate multiple perspectives on a complex issue and generate their own analysis based on reasoning, knowledge and experience.” Test takers will be expected to provide analysis from more than just their perspective on a specific topic. Further details about the nature of the new essay are scant, but it will still be optional and the time limit may be extended from the current 30 minutes.

ACT vs SAT – A Tale of Two Essays

One of the questions we get asked a lot as teachers and tutors is “What’s the deal with the essay, anyway?” Interestingly, this question is asked by both SAT students and ACT students. Let me break it down for ya, fellas…

 

 

First the ACT and SAT prompts are very different. The ACT presents topics that students can easily relate to and have some familiarity with. The ACT topics are often about school or education. The SAT, on the other hand, presents prompts that are a bit more esoteric, obscure and arcane (see what I did there? ). Here are samples of each:

ACT vs SAT: The Amazing Race

ACT is to SAT as Wedges is to Fries

In our continuing ACT vs SAT series (if you’ve not been following you might want to click this link and check out the others), we break down the difference in pacing on the two tests. We’ll help you make sense of pacing and timing on the SAT versus the ACT. You’ve probably already read or heard that the ACT is a faster test than the SAT, and we’re here to give that a little more context and help you figure out what that means to you.

 

Timing

When people say “The ACT is a faster test” what they really mean is that the ACT overall allots less time per question.  

ACT vs SAT: The only difference that matters

Darth SAT vs Darth ACT

In our continuing quest to put to rest the fruitless debate between the two college entry behemoths, we give you the definitive answer to which test you should take.

After all talk is over and after all the pros and cons have been listed, the one and only difference you need to worry about is which test you do better on!

No matter what the group statistics imply, no matter what your friends have done, no matter who was admitted with which scores last year, all that matters is which test provides you the best opportunity to demonstrate to colleges your ability to do well at their school.

ACT vs SAT: Myths and Legends

 

In recent years, students have increasingly faced the challenge of deciding which college admission tests to take. They are receiving conflicting, vague, or incorrect advice from counselors, parents, blogs, internet experts, admission officers, concerned citizens, and busybodies of all varieties. Instead of solving the problem and making the decision easier, this information overload can often increase the confusion. To help you make a decision (and hopefully not just add to the noise), we’ve started this “ACT vs. SAT” series, which will provide specific points points of comparison and clear (hopefully) unbiased information that will help you create your ACT vs. SAT scorecard. To kick things off, we’ll dispel a few of the most egregious myths we’ve heard in the ACT/SAT discussion.

5 Common Misconceptions

ACT vs SAT: Fee Waiver Throwdown

There are many great debates in the country today: Democrat vs Republic, Charter schools vs Public schools, Robert Frost vs E.E. Cummings, Lebron vs Kobe, McDonald’s vs Burger King … the list goes on and on. We’d like to weigh in on one of the most important debates of our time: The SAT or the ACT?

College-bound students today are having this debate in numbers that their predecessors, ancestors, and older siblings never did. In part due to the ubiquity (SAT word!) of acceptance of either test, and in part due to the growing awareness of testing options, students are now more frequently asking themselves “which one should I take?” The answers are as varied as are the answers to all of the debates mentioned above, and as passionately defended. We’re going to try to be the voice of reason and help you make the decision by providing as much information and perspective as we can. There are a lot of factors that go into making this decision, from what a particular school is looking for to what subjects the student excels in, but here’s something else to consider: fee waivers.  Or more specifically, what fee waivers do and do not include. Today’s post will help you understand this often overlooked difference and how it might help make the difference for you.

October 2012 SAT Vocabulary: Phlegmatic Vainglorious Narcissistic Polymaths

 

In the world of test preparation, December brings not only presents from Santa but it also brings many gifts from the College Board and colleges. Today’s College Board gift is a copy of the October 2012 SAT, which we get because one of our staff took the test and ordered the Question and Answer Service (for an additional $18, unless you have a fee waiver which will also waive the fee for the QAS if you choose to order it.) The QAS is available for the June, October and Jan SAT administrations each year and whenever its available we get it so we can peruse the test for trends,  patterns,  and any fun new words the College Board has decided to throw at college-bound students.

If you’re planning to take the SAT soon you should make sure you learn all the words on the list below, which were taken from the October 2012 SAT.

  • plodding
  • soothed
  • novella
  • modest
  • incredulity
  • recrimination
  • commensurate
  • indifferent
  • acclamation
  • disproportionate
  • autonomous
  • expedient
  • communal
  • munificent
  • narcissistic
  • egalitarian
  • reciprocal
  • aroused
  • perspicacious
  • phlegmatic
  • estimable
  • overbearing
  • resolute
  • philistine
  • polymath
  • charlatan
  • ideologue
  • cultivated
  • benevolent
  • pedantic
  • morose
  • gregarious
  • cosmopolitan
  • cavalier
  • urbane
  • erudite
  • mordant
  • unequivocal
  • consensus
  • pervasive
  • archetypal
  • lumbering
  • behemoths
  • Belittle
  • cynical
  • ambivalent
  • nostalgic
  • contempt
  • embroiled
  • degraded
  • underscore
  • exploit
  • unravel
  • foretell
  • scant
  • ambitious
  • timid
  • vaingloriously
  • unflagging
  • indefatigable
  • complacent
  • ineffectual
  • circumspect
  • baffle
  • enmity
  • defy
  • elucidate
  • duplicity
  • collusion
  • superfluous
  • pragmatic
  • onerous
  • subversive
  • fraudulent
  • obliged
  • supplant
  • skew
  • profound
  • mollify
  • soporific
  • insidious
  • bewildering
  • indiscernible

If you’d like a  few other lists to keep your studying going click here to see the others  we posted.

Good luck and remember if you need help preparing for the SAT or ACT visit us at sat.bellcurves.com!

ACT Science Test: No science required

Many test-takers have told us that they chose the SAT over the ACT because they were uncertain/cautious/leery/petrified of the science part of the test.  But never fear, here I come to save the day! (cue Mighty Mouse theme)

The truth of the matter is that the Science Test is a misnomer – instead it should be called the ACT Science-y Test, the ACT Science-Lite Test, or maybe the ACT Loosely-Related-to-Scientific-Thinking Test.

 

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